That sneaky 30% Federal Income Tax Bracket

Running some income tax scenarios for when we finally retire in 2018, we ran into a situation where our ordinary income would be taxed at a whopping 30% marginal rate on our federal return, despite having a total income of “only” around $100,000 (married filing jointly). How is that possible? There is no 30% bracket, only 10, 15, 25, 28, 33, 35, and 39.6%. Moreover, the 30%+ rates don’t even start until $231,450 taxable income for married joint filers, right?

Wrong! If your ordinary income is in the 15% bracket (between $18,550 and $75,300 AGI for married filing jointly in tax year 2016, according to the Tax Foundation), but you have sizable long-term capital gains that bring the total taxable income to more than $75,300, then you will face a marginal tax rate of 30% on ordinary income and 15% on long-term capital gains. The 15% marginal on capital gains is obvious, because that’s their marginal rate in the third bracket. For every additional dollar of ordinary income you are taxed $0.15, but you also push one additional dollar of previously untaxed capital gains (or dividends) into the 15% bracket. The total impact is $0.30, see illustration below:

Diagram for 30pc Fed Tax Bracket
30% Federal Tax Bracket for Ordinary Income: An Illustration

If you don’t believe it, check out the Turbotax TaxCaster tool (this is for 2015 taxes, though, but works just the same) and enter:

  1. Married filing jointly
  2. Ordinary income $50,000
  3. Long-term capital gains $50,000

This yields a 2015 estimated federal tax of $4,166. Changing the ordinary income to $51,000 increases the tax liability to $4,466. 30% marginal, for exactly the reasons laid out above. Very sneaky! For early retirees with ordinary income and sizable capital gains, proper tax planning and timing is even more important than we thought.

This is already the second instance of deceptive accounting in the IRS code. The other is the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) 28% marginal tax bracket, which is actually a 35% effective marginal tax rate for many tax payers because for every dollar of additional income you also lose $0.25 of the AMT deduction, so your taxes go up by $0.28+0.25*$0.28=$0.35.

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13 thoughts on “That sneaky 30% Federal Income Tax Bracket

  1. Sneaky! These “little” details in the tax code aren’t so little.

    Taxcaster is great for running different scenarios and learning the impact of incremental changes.

    Best,
    -PoF

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ooh, I love stuff like this! Never thought about this scenario. Very interesting and nicely depicted with the bar graphs. I’ll have to start doing this type of analysis next year, when I may start rolling IRA dollars into a Roth, depending on the tax implications.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yup, and it can go both ways: the 30% could hit you in retirement due to required minimum distributions and high dividend income and capital gains. That may make the Roth conversion more attractive to some people.
      Thanks for the return visit! 🙂
      Cheers!

      Like

  3. Interesting calculation. Never heard of this issue before. This would be relevant for folks who do the Roth conversion and who may not realize that the marginal tax on the conversion is 30% rather than 15%. At 30% it may not be worth it any more! Very sneaky indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks! And it works both ways. You may have the 30% sneaky tax rate today and only 15% in the future, so you definitely don’t do the conversion. But it could also be the other way around: due to future required minimum distributions you might get into this situation in retirement, so you definitely want to do the conversion now at 15% and save 30% later.
      Cheers!

      Like

    • Thanks for stopping by! Good question!
      In the example used in Turbotax we have an effective tax rate of 4.166% going up to 4.4%. Not a big difference. But the whole issue is about *marginal* rates. The marginal dollar of ordinary income is taxed at 30%, which could have implications for how to time your ordinary income if you have a large unforeseen capital gain. By shifting your other income you could make 15% in one year with very little effort.
      Or alternatively it has implications for the attractiveness of Roth conversions, see one of the discussions above.
      Cheers!

      Like

        • Yup! And if you can push your ordinary income down to below ~$25k, which is the standard deduction for married filing jointly, plus 3 exemptions (2 adults plus one kid), then you can make another $75k in long term capital gains or dividends and pay no federal taxes at all. Not that we will be able to engineer that, but some people apparently can.
          The current U.S. tax system is very advantageous to the early retirement crowd. Let’s hope it stays that way. 🙂

          Like

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