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Guest Post on Budgets are Sexy: My Top 7 Disagreements With Personal Finance Experts

J. Money, the personal finance blogger who runs Budgets are Sexy and RockstarFinance asked yours truly to write a guest post! Wow, what an honor! And, it turns out, this is actually my first guest post ever (not counting the “Christopher Guest Post” on the Physician on FIRE blog two months ago because that’s actually an interview). What did I write about? Initially, I proposed to go on an all-expenses-paid trip to Tahiti to review some luxury resorts and report back, uhm, some time later this year. But J$ had another brilliant idea: write about my favorite finance pet peeves. And it got published today:

My Top 7 Disagreements With Personal Finance Experts

Of course, to read it all, you’ll have to head over to Budgets are Sexy. But please see below for supplemental material, i.e., some of our blog posts on the seven topics:

  1. Safe Withdrawal Rate:
  2. Robo-Advisers:
  3. Emergency Funds:
  4. Bonds to diversify equity risk:
  5. Bond vs. Stock Risk:
  6. Cash as bear market insurance:
  7. Tax loss harvesting:

 

 

 

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Happy Thanksgiving!

No designated post about personal finance today! But in the spirit of Thanksgiving, we thank all of you for coming over to check out our little blog. Thanks for all your comments and feedback. Especially our most prolific commenters:

Thanks also for featuring our work on your blogs:

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My Interview on the Physician on FIRE blog!

My interactions with medical doctors normally involve the question “on a scale from 0 to 10, how much pain do you feel?” So, I was relieved when my blogging friend Physician of FIRE invited me over to answer questions about blogging, personal finance, and life in general as part of his “Christopher Guest Post” series. But given Dr. PoF’s strange fascination with “spinal taps” and the number 11, I was a bit nervous at first:

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Coming soon to a hospital near you?!

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The dangers of getting close to retirement: “Yeah, I’ll do that when I’m retired!”

The other day, my wife asked me to take out the trash. My response: “Yeah, I’ll do that when I’m retired!” We both got a pretty good laugh out of that one. After I took out the trash (pre-retirement, obviously), we realized that our planned retirement date, hopefully in early 2018, creates all sorts of inefficiencies; I catch us procrastinating already! YIDTWIR=”Yeah, I’ll do that when I’m retired!” Are they the seven most dangerous words for the approaching-FIRE crowd?

Procrastination is as old as humanity and if there weren’t enough temptations to postpone stuff already, a retirement date in the near future is the mother of all reasons: Procrastination-palooza! Think about how much procrastination an absolutely arbitrary date like January 1 creates: “I’ll quit smoking/go to the gym/work less/work more/etc. in the New Year!” The main reason for New Year’s resolutions is that they give you cover – a guilt-free, chain-smoking, TV-binge-watching couch potato existence between late October and December 31. There is absolutely nothing magical about January 1 but it still creates New Year’s resolutions. And, of course, resolutions are never broken but just postponed to January 1 of the next-next year.

But an upcoming retirement date is different in that you will actually have more time on your hands.Read More »

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Five Fishy Finance Phrases Deserving Diabolical Deaths

Halloween is around the corner, as evidenced by the annual return of the “Pumpkin Spice Latte” at Starbucks and 5-pound bags of sweet stuff at the grocery store! That’s also a good time to stab through the heart and kill with a silver bullet all those scary senseless finance myths, truisms, and falsehoods. Every time I hear one of the phrases below I suffer a mini heart attack. I hope people would stop saying those.Read More »

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Top 10 reasons for having an emergency fund – debunked (Part 1)

In a past blog post, we pointed out that a $0.00 emergency fund is most useful for us. Lots of visitor traffic came from both Physician of FIRE and Rockstar Finance (thanks for featuring us!!!) and most comments were very supportive. Good to know that others follow a similar approach. To make the case more complete we should also look at some of the standard arguments people normally use in favor of keeping a large stash of cash for emergencies.

That’s because in addition to some of the complaints we got in the comments section, someone we quoted in our post, Scott Alan Turner, is a blogger and podcaster and he dedicated almost an entire 28 minute podcast (transcript included if you don’t want to spend 28 minutes) to our theory and why he thinks we’re wrong. We respectfully disagree!

For full disclosure: I really like Scott’s blog and podcasts in general. I mean no disrespect and like to invite everybody to check out his material. I agree with most of what he has to say, just not the advice on emergency funds! Enjoy!

So, let’s look at some of the arguments in favor of an emergency fund and debunk them. It took us a while to put this together, but better late than never!Read More »

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Happy Birthday, USA

Every year around this time, when Americans celebrate Independence Day we gather with friends and family, get the BBQ going and watch fireworks at night. We celebrate Independence Day on July 4, but of course every single day of the year we celebrate independence. Just like we celebrate diversity, tolerance, hard work, innovation,… you name it. But Independence has always been particularly dear to our hearts. All of us in the FIRE (Financial Independence/Retire Early) community must have that Independence bug in us, too. We think outside the box, we are nonconformist and declare Independence from paychecks, rush hour traffic and out-of-control consumerism. While we don’t want to draw any parallels between Mr. ERN’s boss and King George III, we will certainly not miss leaving behind all the nonsense of work life, least of which the excessive taxation.

Incidentally, excessive taxation was one of the sparks that set off the American Revolution. Moving to a state with no income tax and getting into a much lower federal income tax bracket, hopefully within the next two years, will be our way of sticking it to the tax-man. It’s a little bit like one mini Boston Tea Party for everyone of us achieving FIRE. Obviously not as violent and risky as facing his majesty’s well-armed and trained soldiers centuries ago but nevertheless quite revolutionary.Read More »

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Top 10 reasons for targeting more than 25 times annual spending

We started writing this blog post a while ago and were happy to see that right around the same time, other bloggers we like and follow published nice pieces around the topic of reasons to delay early retirement:

So, why might someone delay pulling the trigger for a while? You have saved diligently for ten years or more and finally reached the magic number: a Net Worth of 25 times your current spending. That’s an impressive amount, probably somewhere in the seven figures. Now what? Quit your job and enjoy retirement! Not so fast, here are the top 10 reasons for delaying retirement and accumulate more net worth than 25 times spending:Read More »

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Pros and cons of different withdrawal rate rules

Update Dec 7, 2016: Check our new series on safe withdrawal rates: The Ultimate Guide to Safe Withdrawal Rates – Part 1: Introduction

Look around in the early retirement community and everybody is raving about the 4% rule. It’s a “safe” withdrawal rate, we are told, by the Trinity Study and some in the early retirement community. Some claims, we found, are downright false but more on that later.Read More »